Most Dangerous Films of Hollywood Ever Made

Some artists say that suffering is necessary to create meaningful art… but there have to be limits, right? Getting mauled by a lion, or driving a truck off a cliff is the kind of that suffering seems to be reserved exclusively for those whose art is the Hollywood film—and for better and worse, these movies were among the most hazardous to the health of cast and crew.

Waterworld While it’s seen today as something of a curiosity, 1995’s Waterworld was a spectacularly misguided, career-derailing failure for Kevin Costner. The most expensive film ever made at the time, it baffled audiences with its bizarre mythology and uneven tone.

“Hey! Hahah!” And as might be expected from a film that takes place on a world covered in ocean, the seafaring shoot was more than a little hazardous, and nearly killed several members of the cast and crew.

Everyday unpleasantness included seasickness and constant jellyfish stings. One costly set sunk, and a diver suffered an almost-lethal case of the bends during the retrieval effort. Female lead Jeanne Tripplehorn and child actress Tina Majorino had to be rescued by divers when their sailboat fell apart, and Costner was pummeled by raging winds and seawater for more than half an hour while suspended 40 feet in the air for a stunt.

Even one experienced stuntman, famous big wave surfer Bill Hamilton, was lost at sea while commuting to the shoot on a jet ski, and had to be rescued by a production helicopter. The entire shoot was one gigantic risk to life and limb, all for a film that, well… “What do you think, Toby? The truth!” “… looks like s—.

” The Expendables 3 Given the age of the cast, it stands to reason that the Expendables films have dished out a few injuries to its stars, but The Expendables 3 really seemed to have it in for its unusually old cast.

“Age is just a state of mind.” Then-68-year old Sylvester Stallone suffered a scary fall that necessitated a metal plate in his back, which joined the one in his neck from an injury suffered on the set of the first film.

Co-star Antonio Banderas injured his knee in his very first take. But the production reserved its worst mishap for Jason Statham, who drove his truck straight off a dock during a rehearsal and into the Black Sea.

Everybody panicked—except Statham, who calmly swam to safety as the truck sank into the depths. Still, Statham told Jimmy Fallon that he wasn’t nearly as calm headed as everyone thought. “So I’m like, 60ft at the bottom of the Black Sea, stuck in the mud, thinking, ‘Hang on a minute.

How am I gonna get out of this? This is how it ends!'” While Statham called it a “nightmare,” instinct kicked in and he made it out safely. Co-star Terry Crews summed it up, saying, “Jason Statham is a true bad, bad dude.

” Roar If ever a film seemed specifically designed to threaten the safety of everyone involved, it’s 1981’s Roar. The brainchild of actress Tippi Hedren and her writer/producer husband Noel Marshall, it’s the story of a family attacked by wild jungle animals during a stay in Africa, and it was executed in the most insane fashion imaginable.

Dismayed to find that you couldn’t just rent lions, Hedren and Marshall bought a ranch and began raising their own, along with tigers, leopards, cheetahs, and even African elephants. Then they went ahead and shot their movie right there on the ranch with their own children, working with some of the most incredibly dangerous animals on the planet.

“C’mon, you’ll hurt my hand. Ohh ohh ohh.” Of course, the injuries piled up. Hedren was bitten on the head by a lion, and Marshall was bit so many times he developed gangrene. Hedren’s daughter Melanie Griffith received stitches to her face and almost lost an eye after an attack, and the cinematographer almost lost his entire scalp to a lion, an injury requiring over 200 stitches.

Many of the attacks made the final cut of the film, which wasn’t given any kind of North American release until 2015. Years later, Hedren estimated the number of injuries at over 100 and called Roar “the most dangerous film ever made in history.

” Troy The 2004 war epic Troy was one of the most expensive, lavishly staged films to ever be so indifferently received. It’s mostly remembered today for the strange fate of one of its stunt performers, and for one of the most coincidental injuries in film history.

During a scene with many extras, stuntman George Camilleri sustained a severe injury to his lower leg, requiring surgery. A couple weeks later, he was re-admitted to the hospital, and quickly passed away from a pulmonary thromboembolism, a common complication after an injury of his type.

The film’s star Brad Pitt, cast as Achilles, also somehow managed to injure his character’s namesake tendon during the shoot, causing production to be shut down for ten weeks. Hurricane Marty also damaged some sets, but Troy overcame all of these difficulties and arrived triumphantly in theaters, only to be met with a solid thump.

Jumper The 2008 sci-fi thriller Jumper didn’t cause any problems until principal photography had wrapped, but when it did, it was lethal. Set dressers were tearing down exterior sets in the middle of a cold Toronto winter when a freakish mishap occurred: a huge chunk of sand and earth which was frozen to a wall came unstuck, striking three set dressers.

56-year old David Ritchie didn’t survive, and another man sustained serious injuries to his head and shoulders. Toronto police described it as a “fluke accident,” and the incident cast a pall over the highly anticipated film, which unfortunately didn’t score well with… anyone.

xXx It goes without saying that xXx was a dangerous film to make, as the story of an extreme sports badass who becomes a secret government agent. Each stunt ramps up the danger, and one spectacular stunt unfortunately cost aerial stunt coordinator Harry O’Connor his life, as director Rob Cohen recounts on the DVD commentary.

“Now, unfortunately, right there, smacking into the bridge, breaking his neck, and dying.” O’Connor’s stunt remained in the completed film… right up until the point in which he doesn’t clear the structure.

Cohen considered the stunt to be so routine that he assigned it to his second unit, and most of the cast and crew had already completed their work on the film. Resident Evil: The Final Chapter The Resident Evil series of films is the most profitable video game-to-film series adaptation of all time, but 2016’s Resident Evil: The Final Chapter proved to be just as big a threat to life and limb as the film’s roving zombies.

Stuntwoman Olivia Jackson suffered horrific injuries when a camera rig failed to make way for her during a motorcycle stunt, requiring her to be put into a medically induced coma. Her list of injuries were extensive and gory, including having her skin torn from her face, a severed neck artery, a shattered shoulderblade, a collapsed lung, a brain bleed, and the loss of her left arm.

Unfortunately, the incident didn’t seem to lead to increased caution on the set. Only a couple months later, crew member Ricardo Cornelius was crushed when a Humvee slipped off of a platform and pinned him to a wall.

Reports of the accident leaked only after the film had completed production. Apocalypse Now Perhaps no film shoot was as legendarily taxing on everyone involved as Francis Ford Coppola’s masterpiece Apocalypse Now; that everyone survived its filming is nothing short of a miracle.

Shooting on location in Vietnam, the production was beset by tropical disease, and natural disasters that wiped out entire sets, but those were the least of their problems. Coppola was running a drug-fueled, psychologically abusive madhouse that was out of control from the very beginning.

Lead actor Martin Sheen stepped straight into the worst possible environment for him at that time. In the middle of a personal breakdown and mired deep in alcoholism, Sheen was fed a steady diet of alcohol and abuse by Coppola, who brought out the darkness in Sheen’s character by screaming at the actor and telling him how evil he was.

“Sometimes he goes too far. He’s the first one to admit it.” Sheen would eventually have a heart attack, yet somehow continued on with the production. Coppola himself lost 100 pounds, and Dennis Hopper stumbled through the shoot on an insane daily regimen of a case of beer, half gallon of rum, and three ounces of cocaine.

Actor Sam Bottoms spent the entire year-long shoot tripping on LSD. Hopper later commented, “Ask anybody who was out there, we all felt like we fought the war.” Ben-Hur 1959’s Ben-Hur is well-known for its iconic chariot race scene, which was filmed on the largest set ever constructed at that time, covering 18 acres.

It was also at the time the most expensive single scene in history at $4 million dollars, and took over ten grueling weeks. The action-packed sequence was virtually unprecedented in cinema, employing a “camera car” that put viewers right in the middle of the chaotic, horse-drawn action.

Most impressive was this dangerous scene, where Ben-Hur is nearly thrown from his chariot. The stunt was performed by Joe Canutt, who landed so hard that he really was pitched violently off the chariot and in between its two horses.

“Well, it turned him a complete handspring over the chariot, and he managed to hang with one hand and get a hold of the hitch rail and turn to flip off into the speeding wall.” He sustained only a cut on his chin, but to this day, rumors persist that studio MGM covered up the death of a stunt performer—simply because it’s so hard to believe nobody died filming that scene.

The Conqueror The second-to-last film produced by Howard Hughes would haunt him for the rest of his life. The Conqueror was a big-budget flop featuring a woefully miscast John Wayne as an unintentionally comedic Genghis Khan.

During the last years of his life, Hughes bought up all the prints he could find and watched the film obsessively, perhaps mortified by its failure, or perhaps racked with guilt for having basically executed the entire cast.

The film was shot on location in the Utah desert, directly downwind from the area where the US government detonated over 100 atomic bombs between 1951 and 1962. An atomic bomb at the Nevada test site, 140 miles to the west.

But it’s old stuff to St. George.” Eleven were detonated in 1953 alone, the year before The Conqueror began production. The risks of nuclear fallout were not terribly well-understood at the time, and the Atomic Energy Commission declared the area completely safe.

They were staggeringly, horrifyingly wrong. In the decades following the film’s production, no fewer than 90 cast and crew passed away from cancer, including Wayne, lead actress Susan Hayward, and director Dick Powell.

A subsequent study concluded that Cold War-era nuclear testing had killed at least 11,000 Americans. “When you saw the tragedy in terms of the families, it sort of… broke your heart.” Since 1990, Congress has paid $2 billion dollars to residents of the fallout area in which The Conqueror was filmed.

It was one of Hollywood’s biggest turkeys, it killed one of its biggest stars, and it just may have finished the job of driving Howard Hughes totally insane. Thanks for watching! Click the Looper icon to subscribe to our YouTube channel.

Plus check out all this cool stuff we know you’ll love, too! some artists say that suffering is necessary to create meaningful art but there have to be limits right getting mauled by a lion or driving a truck off a cliff it’s a kind of suffering that seems to be reserved exclusively for those whose art is a Hollywood film and for better and worse these movies were among the most hazardous to the health of the cast and crew Waterworld while it’s seen today as something of a curiosity 1995’s Waterworld was a spectacularly misguided career de railing failure for Kevin Costner the most expensive film ever made at the time it baffled audiences with its bizarre mythology and an even tone and as might be expected from a film that takes place on a world covered in ocean the seafaring shoot was more than a little hazardous and nearly killed several members of the cast and crew every day in pleasantness included seasickness and constant jellyfish things one costly set sunk and the diver suffered an almost lethal case of the bends during the retrieval effort female lead Jeanne Tripplehorn and a child actress Tina mater Eno had to be rescued by divers when their sailboat fell apart and Costner was pummeled by raging winds and sea water for more than half an hour while suspended 40 feet in the air for a stunt even one experienced that man famous big wave surfer Bill Hamilton was lost at sea while commuting to the chute on a jetski and had to be rescued by a production helicopter the entire shoot was one gigantic risk to life and limb or for a film that well what do you say Joey in true The Expendables 3 given the age of the cast it stands to reason that the Expendables films have dished out a few injuries to its stars but the Expendables 3 really seems to have it in for its and usually old cast age it’s just the state of mind then 68 year-old Sylvester Stallone suffered a scary fool that necessitated a metal plate in his back which joined the one in his neck from an injury suffered on the set of the first film co-star Antonio Banderas injured his knee in his very first take but the production reserved its worst mishap for Jason Statham who drove his truck straight off a dark drawing a rehearsal and into the Black Sea everybody panicked except Statham who calmly swam to safety as the truck has sank into the depths still Statham told Jimmy Fallon that he wasn’t nearly as calm headed as everyone thought so like 60 feet at the bottom of the Black Sea stuck in the mud singing hang on a minute I’m going to get out of this if this is how it ends while Statham called it a nightmare instinct kicked in and he made it out safely co-star Terry Crews summed it up saying Jason Statham is a true bad bad dude raw if ever a film seemed specifically designed to threaten the safety of everyone involved its 1981’s raw the brainchild of actress Tippi Hedren and her writer producer husband Noel Marshall it’s the story of a family attacked by wild jungle animals trying to stay in Africa and it was executed in the most insane fashion imaginable dismayed to find that you couldn’t just rent lions Hedren and Marshall bought a ranch and began raising their own along with tigers leopards cheetahs and even African elephants but then they went ahead and shut their movie right there on the ranch with their own children working with some of the most incredibly dangerous animals on the planet Wow of course the injuries piled up Hedren was bitten on the head by a lion and Marshall was bit so many times he developed gangrene head Ren’s daughter Melanie Griffith received stitches to her face and almost lost an eye after an attack and a cinematographer almost lost his entire scalp to a lion an injury requiring over 200 stitches many of the attacks made the final cut of the film which wasn’t given any kind of North American release until 2015 years later Hedren estimated the number of injuries at over 100 and called roar the most dangerous film ever made in history Troy the 2004 war epic Troy was one of the most expensive lavishly staged films to ever be 7 differently perceived it’s mostly remembered today for the strange fate of one of its stunt performers and for one of the most coincidental injuries in film history drawing a seam of many extras stern’s man George Camilleri sustained a severe injury to his lower leg acquiring surgery a couple weeks later he was readmitted to the hospital and quickly passed away from a pulmonary thromboembolism a common complication after an injury of his type the film star Brad Pitt cast as Achilles also somehow managed to interest characters namesake tendon during the shoot causing production to be shut down for 10 weeks hurricane Marty also damaged some sets but Troy overcame all these difficulties and arrives triumphantly in theaters only to be met with a solid thump jumper at the 2008 sci-fi thriller jumper didn’t cause any problems until principal photography had wrapped but when it did it was lethal set dresses were tearing down exterior sets in the middle of a cold Toronto winter when a freakish mishap occurred a huge chunk of sand on earth which was frozen to a wall came unstuck striking three set dressers six-year-old david ritchie didn’t survive and another man sustained serious injuries to his head and shoulders toronto police described it as a fluke accident and the incident cast a pall over the highly anticipated film which unfortunately didn’t score well with anyone xxx they goes without saying a xxx with a dangerous film to make as the story of an extreme sports badass who becomes a secret government agent each stunt ramps up the danger and the one spectacular stunt unfortunately cost aerial stunt coordinator Harry O’Conner his life as director Rob Cohen McCowan’s on the DVD commentary now unfortunately right there smacking into the bridge breaking his neck and dying O’Connor stunt remained in the completed film right up until the point in which he doesn’t clear the structure Cohen considered the stunt to be servo team that he assigned it to a second unit and to most of the casting crew had already completed their work on the film Resident Evil the final chapter the and evil series of films is the most profitable video game to film series adaptation of all time but 2016 Resident Evil the final chapter proved to be just as big a threat to life and limb as the film’s roving zombies stuntwoman olivia jackson has suffered horrific injuries when a camera rig failed to make way for her during a motorcycle stunt requiring her to be put into a medically induced coma her list of injuries were extensive and gory including having her skin torn from her face a severed neck artery a shattered shoulder blade a collapsed lung a brain bleed and the loss of a left arm and fortunately the incident didn’t seem to lead to increase caution on the set only a couple months later crew member Ricardo Cornelius was crushed when a Humvee slipped off of a platform and pinned him to a wall reports of the accidents leaked only after the film was completed production Apocalypse Now perhaps no film shoot wasn’t legendarily taxing on everyone involved as Francis Ford Coppola smashed a piece of pocalypse now that everyone survived its filming is nothing short of a miracle shooting on location in Vietnam the production was beset by tropical disease and the natural disasters that wiped out entire sets but those were the least of their problems Coppola was running a drug field a psychologically abusive madhouse that was out of control from the very beginning lead actor Martin Sheen stepped straight into the worst possible environment for him at the time in the middle of a personal breakdown and Maya deep in alcoholism Sheen was fed a steady diet of alcohol and abuse by Coppola who brought out the darkness and Sheen’s character by screaming at the actor and telling him how evil he was sometimes ego stood for he’s the first one he admitted Sheen would eventually have a heart attack yet somehow continued on with the production Coppola himself lost 100 pounds and the Dennis Hopper stumbled through the chute on an insane daily regimen of a case of beer half gallon of rum and the three ounces of cocaine actor Sam bottoms has spent the entire year long chute tripping on LSD hopper later commented asked anybody who was out there we all felt like we fought the war ben-hur 1959’s Ben Hur is well known for its iconic chariot race scene which was filmed on the largest set ever constructed at that time covering 18 acres it was also at the time the most expensive single scene in history at four million dollars and took over ten grueling weeks the action-packed sequence was virtually unprecedented in cinema employing a camera car that put viewers right in the middle of the chaotic horse-drawn action most impressive was this dangerous scene where Ben Hur is nearly thrown from his chariot the stunt was performed by Joe cannerts who landed so hard that he really was pitched violently off the chariots and in between its two horses well it turned him a complete him bring over the chariot and he managed to hang with one head and get a hold of the hit trail and turn to flip off into this pinna war he sustained only a cut on his chin but to this day rumors persist that studio MGM had covered up the death of a stunt performer simply because it’s so hard to believe nobody died filming that scene the Conqueror the second-to-last film produced by Howard Hughes would haunt him for the rest of his life the Conqueror was a big-budget flopper featuring a woefully miss cast John Wayne as the unintentionally comedic Genghis Khan during the last years of his life Hughes bought up all the prints he could find and watch the film obsessively perhaps mortified by its failure or perhaps wracked with guilt for having basically executed the entire cast the film was shot on location in the Utah desert directly downwind from the area where the US government detonated over a hundred atomic bombs between 1951 and 1962 an atomic bomb at the Nevada Test Site 140 miles to the west but it sold stuff to st.

George 11 was detonated in 1953 alone year before the Conqueror began production the risks of nuclear fallout were not terribly well understood at the time and the Atomic Energy Commission declared the area completely safe they were staggeringly horrifyingly wrong in the decades following the film’s production no fewer than 90 cast and crew passed away from cancer including Wayne lead actress Susan Hayward and director dick Powell a subsequent study concluded that Cold War air and nuclear testing had killed at least 11,000 Americans when you saw the tragedy in terms of the families sorry dr.

arc since 1990 Congress has paid two billion dollars to residents of the fallout area in which the Conqueror was filmed it was one of Hollywood’s biggest turkeys it killed one of its biggest stars and it just may have finished the job of driving Howard Hughes totally insane thanks for watching click the loop icon to subscribe to our youtube channel plus check out all this cool stuff we know you’re loved too [Music]

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